What’s the difference between Die-Cast & Resin Models?

Die-cast and Resin refers to the material used to manufacturer the body of your favourite models. Die-cast involves the casting of Zinc Alloy, whereas Resin involves the casting of Resin Composite.

DIE-CAST

Molten Zinc Alloy is poured into a mould to cast the body. Zinc Alloy is a mixture of Zinc, Aluminium and Copper, which gives the body strength. This strength allows for features such as opening doors, bonnets, boots or even working suspension. Die-cast is the most traditional form of model manufacturing, first seen in the early 20th century. Die-casting is more suitable for mass production, as the strong Steel moulds can repeatably withstand thousands of castings without wearing.

Die-cast Advantages

  • Allows for functional parts; such as opening doors or working suspension
  • Generally cheaper
  • Stronger and heavier

Resin Disadvantages

  • The zinc alloy is prone to deterioration when in certain environments, which can lead to blistering, distortion and cracking.
  • Rarely produced in small quantities
  • Generally produced in bulk, meaning models replicated are more mainstream.

RESIN

Porsche 911 Carrera RS 3.6 CS 1992 GTSPIRIT GT060 PRODUCT IMAGE

Resin is poured into moulds to cast the parts. To prevent the resin sticking, the moulds are made from soft silicone which is subject to wear, so can only withstand small quantities of casting. Hence, why resin models are more commonly produced in small limited quantities. The casted resin is often more detailed than it’s die-cast counterpart, however isn’t strong enough to feature opening parts, or working suspension.

Resin Advantages

  • Favoured by many collectors, due to their small limited production runs
  • Small quantities allow for wider variety of models or even one-offs.

Resin Disadvantages

  • No opening parts, as panels aren’t strong enough
  • Weaker and lighter

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